Stanley Kubrick

Mysterious 2001-Like Monolith Reappears In Romania

Some seriously freaky shit is going on. Last week, state officials in Utah stumbled upon a mysterious shiny monolith in the middle of the desert. Five days later, it suddenly disappeared. Now, a nearly identical structure has been spotted roughly 6,000 miles across the ocean in Romania. When the first monolith was initially found, there were a couple running theories for who could be behind it. The first was that an ambitious 2001: A Space Odyssey fan had planted a structure in the desert as an ode to the monolith that appears in Stanley Kubrick’s beloved sci-fi film. The second and more likely theory, which was detailed in The New York Times, is that it was planted there years ago by someone associated with the late sculptor John McCracken, who was known for making shiny monolit...

Utah’s 2001-Like Monolith Mysteriously Disappears

A week after the bizarre discovery of a metal monolith in the Utah desert, the mysterious object has disappeared. The three-sided structure was found on November 23rd, while a helicopter from the Utah Department of Public Safety was conducting a survey of bighorn sheep. Located in a remote area of Red Rock County, it reminded film fans of Stanley Kubrick’s sci-fi classic 2001: A Space Odyssey. Standing ten to 12 feet tall, it had been installed with “some type of concrete-cutting tool or something to really dig down… and embed it really well,” a spokesman told The New York Times. It’s unclear who put it there, when they’d done so, and why. Now, it’s gone. On November 28th, Utah’s Bureau of Land Management said in a statement that “an unknown party” had “removed it on the evening of No...

Strange 2001-Like Monolith Found in Utah Desert

Cue up Richard Strauss, turn off all artificial intelligence, and hold on to your butts: the Star Child may have arrived. According to The Guardian, Utah state employees have uncovered a silver monolith out in the remote desert that bears a striking resemblance to the iconic obelisk at the center… Please click the link below to read the full article. Strange 2001-Like Monolith Found in Utah Desert Michael Roffman You Deserve to Make Money Even When you are looking for Dates Online. So we reimagined what a dating should be. It begins with giving you back power. Get to meet Beautiful people, chat and make money in the process. Earn rewards by chatting, sharing photos, blogging and help give users back their fair share of Internet revenue.

Ranking: Every James Bond Movie from Worst to Best

This feature originally ran in November 2015 and is being republished in honor of the late Sir Sean Connery. Despite its relatively rigid formulas, the past 60 years have seen 007 innovate and change with the times — from the swinging ’60s sophistication of Sean Connery to the wacky, winking camp of Roger Moore in the ’70s; from Timothy Dalton’s harder edge in the ‘80s to the slick, techno-infused commercialism of Pierce Brosnan in the ’90s. Even Daniel Craig’s macho navel-gazing has brought us a more sensitive, introspective Bond for a 21st century audience. To that end, us agents here at Consequence of Sound decided to provide our own collective assessment of the Bond films from worst to best, along with our dissection of what makes each entry unique. So sit back with your vodka martini ...

Room 237: The Shining Pop-Up Experience Opening in Chicago

All work and no play can make anyone feel dull, especially in 2020. That’s why Consequence of Sound, Morgan MFG, and The Losers’ Club invite all Chicagoans to Room 237, a new, massive pop-up experience and lounge inspired by Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining. Starting October 15th, the West Loop hot spot will be transformed into The Overlook Hotel, where guests can take a tour of its haunted rooms, enjoy some themed cocktails in the Gold Room, and, of course, get lost in its giant hedge maze. The immersive experience was co-created by Heaven Malone, who designed the original Gold Room pop-up bar that entertained thousands of guests throughout the Winter of 2018 at Chicago’s The Rookery. This time, he went bigger. “During the shutdown, I was isolated in my apartment with all of these Room 237 p...

The 100 Greatest Summer Blockbuster Movies of All Time

“Cool.” “Riveting.” “Gripping.” “High-Octane Thrill Ride!” All cliches of film criticism and yet all feelings we’ve experienced while watching a crackerjack summer blockbuster. Oops, there we go again. All things considered, any moviegoer can speak to the divine feeling of sitting in a cool, packed theater in the heat of the summer and being united by narrative. Not just united, but hypnotized, mentally convinced that the fate of the world is before your eyes, and there is nothing more important in that very moment. It’s escapism. It’s popcorn. It’s Chinatown. But also, it’s the power of spectacle. Over the years, Hollywood has certainly run that concept through the ringer, having turned what used to be a summer blockbuster season into, well, an entire calendar year. Now, all those aforeme...

The 20 Greatest Summer Blockbuster Movie Trailers

Blockbuster Month is celebrating the true titans of the genre. In the weeks ahead, you’ll read through a variety of features digging deep into the greatest hits of Hollywood, from popcorn classics to underrated gems. Today, we head to the theater early with Editor-in-Chief Michael Roffman to revisit the greatest trailers in summer blockbuster history. Hype begins with the trailer. Sure, there’s the studio announcement, the lobby poster, even the intellectual property itself, but there’s nothing like first seeing those epic few minutes. If you’re lucky, you get some glimpses of the action, a sense of the film’s tone, maybe even pieces of a score, and a tagline that sends shivers up your spine. Yeah, that’s when the magic sets in. Today, we take the trailer for granted. We not only know ther...

Stephen King’s The Shining: The Opera Streaming for Free

All work and no play makes life dull for opera fans, which is why this piece of news should get them singing again. As Bloody Disgusting points out, the Minnesota Opera is streaming an audio recording of its 2016 production of The Shining. At the time, the production sold out its entire two-week run at St. Paul’s Ordway Theater, making this all the more of a sweet treat for fans who never snagged tickets. Granted, it’s only audio, but hey, we take what we can get. Written by Mark Campbell and composer Paul Moravec, The Shining works heavily from King’s novel. However, Bloody Disgusting says the production also “borrowed flourishes from the Stanley Kubrick film adaptation,” writing “the Overlook’s ghostly residents … were represented by a combination of light projections and live performers...

What’s the Scariest Scene in Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining?

It’s been 40 years since Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining axed its way into theaters on May 23, 1980. Since then, the Stephen King adaptation has haunted multiple generations, who have all made their way through the Overlook Hotel doors, be it through repertory screenings, video store rentals, Saturday night sleepovers, or simply cable. Today, The Shining is a fixture of pop culture, having spawned countless memes, GIFs, homages, figurines, you name it, it’s been done. And yet, most would agree it’s still one of the most terrifying films of all time — if not the most terrifying. Of course, as with anything, fear is entirely subjective, and what’s scary to one person may be hilarious to another. Editors’ Picks That’s why we polled our staff and contributors to see what they think is the ...

40 Years Later, Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining Is a State of Mind

The Overlook Hotel will never close. It’s been burned down, shuddered up, and even burned down again, but there’s no moving on. The walls, halls, and spooky rooms of the ghoulish institution are as obdurate as the spirits within, and they’ll remain that way forever. Point being, the Overlook Hotel isn’t just a setting in a story or a movie. It’s no longer just a name Stephen King gave to his own vision of The Stanley Hotel. And it’s not just the prismatic hell that Stanley Kubrick dreamed up a few years later. It’s been absorbed by the public consciousness; no different than Jack Torrance at the very end of the 1980 film. Of course, none of this would have happened without said film. Thanks to its labyrinthine qualities and MoMa-ready aesthetics, Kubrick’s chilling masterpiece has spawned ...